Global projects

We work across borders to enable research and policy to improve health for people around the world.

We tackle the biggest worldwide threats to human health.

Climate change

Measures to tackle climate change could significantly benefit human health in the next few years, as well as in the long-term, says a new report from the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Society, released today [Thursday 14 October]. The report calls on the UK government to make sure that the initiatives they establish to tackle climate change are also designed to deliver benefits to health.

We also work on the human consequences of the instability that climate change is bringing. In 2020 45 million+ people were internally displaced within their own countries. We worked with the Refugee Law Initiative and the UN Secretary General's High-Level Panel on Internal Displacement to report the health needs of internally displaced people.

Pandemics

See our COVID-19 hub page. 

Antimicrobial resistance

Long-term misuse of antibiotics is predicted to lead to 10 million deaths a year worldwide due to untreatable infections by 2050 without urgent action. We have been working on the critical topic of antimicrobial resistance thorugh a UK-India meeting supported by the Hamied Foundation on the global challenge of antimicrobial resistance.

Multiple long-term health conditions

We produced the world’s first comprehensive review on the increasing global problem of multimorbidity, where people are suffering from more than one serious health condition. We highlighted the inadequacy of existing evidence to guide health policy and medical practice, and suggested a series of urgent research priorities. We are now leading as a hub organisation for multimorbidity and our work has already led to a joint funding call in the UK context.

“The Academy’s report on multimorbidity has galvanised policy-makers, funders and researchers to ask, “What can be done to better serve these patients and their families?” Professor Chris Whitty CB FMedSci, Chief Medical Officer