Unmet need in healthcare funding allocations

The Academy of Medical Sciences, supported by the British Academy and NHS England have undertaken some policy work on unmet need in healthcare, aimed at informing NHS England’s review of its funding allocations formulae.

Launched

The Academy of Medical Sciences, supported by the British Academy and NHS England have undertaken some policy work on unmet need in healthcare, aimed at informing NHS England’s review of its funding allocations formulae.

The NHS allocations formulae, which direct over £100 billion of funding to CCGs, primary care and specialised service are designed to address differences in the needs of the population across different regions. These formulae are developed by NHS England with assistance from the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation, which consists of independent experts.

“Unmet need” stems either from people being unable or unwilling to access NHS services for their health problems, or from patients receiving inadequate care once in the care of the NHS. The allocations formulae use data of service utilisation to adjust the allocations based on geographical need. However, if the geographical distribution of unmet need does not correlate to service utilisation (“met need”), there will be a disparity of funding. As such, the allocations formulae include an assessment of unmet need by using a proxy measurement, standardised mortality ratio for those aged under 75 years of age (SMR<75), which measures excess deaths below the age of 75. This proxy currently drives approximately £9 billion of funding.

Whether SMR<75 is an effective proxy or whether there is a more reliable measure of unmet need has been a source of debate for NHS England and ACRA for many years. NHS England have sought to continually improve the allocations formulae by reviewing the evidence for a better measurement of unmet need that could be used in the allocations formulae.

Staff leads


Labour party conference 2018

Book Now

Conservative party conference 2018

Book Now

2018 The Academy of Medical Sciences and The Lancet International Health Lecture

Book Now
View more
 
 
 
 
 
 
FB Twitter Instagram Youtube